Governance Enables Service Reuse – New Podcast Episode

December 27, 2011
Want to listen using iTunes?

Got iTunes?

podcast

New episode added to the Software Reuse Podcast Series on service governance covering design, implementation, testing, and provisioning and how they enable reuse.

Like this post? Subscribe to RSS feed or get blog updates via email.


5 Service Governance Practices for Effective Reuse

December 24, 2011

Pursuing service based systematic reuse or business process development? Then, these five practices will help your teams achieve increased level of service reuse.

  1. Manage a common set of domain objects that are leveraged across service capabilities. This could be a library of objects (e.g. Plain Old Java Objects) or XML Schema definitions or both. Depending on the number of service consumers and the complexity in the domain, there will be need for supporting multiple concurrent versions of these objects.
  2. Provide common utilities for not only service development but WSDL generation, integration and performance testing, and ensure interoperability issues are addressed
  3. Appropriate functional experts are driving the service’s requirements and common capabilities across business processes are identified early in the software development lifecycle
  4. Governance model guidelines are clearly documented and communicated¬† – for example, there are a class of changes that can be made to a public interface such as a WSDL that don’t impact existing service clients and there are some that do.
  5. Performance testing needs to be done not only during development but during service provisioning – i.e. integrating a new service consumer. If your teams aren’t careful, one heavy volume consumer, can overwhelm a service impacting both new and existing consumers. Execute performance testing in an automated fashion – every time you integrate with a new client to reduce risks of breaching required SLAs

What additional practices do your teams follow?


5 Signs Indicating Need for Service Governance

August 21, 2010

The word ‘governance’ seems to conjure up all sorts of negative images for IT folks – needless bureaucracy seems to top that list. However, without lightweight governance, SOA and systematic reuse efforts will fail to achieve their full potential. Can you spot signs that indicate need for governance? I believe so and here are five:

  1. Every project seems to reinvent business abstractions that are fundamental to your problem domain. No sharing or consistency of information models – this will be painfully evident when projects are happening back to back and your teams seem to be running into overlapping data modeling, data definition, and data validation issues.
  2. Directly linked to above – is service definitions seem to not reuse schemas – i.e. each service has a unique schema definition for a customer or product (or some key object from your domain) and your service consumers are forced to deal with multiple conflicting schemas.
  3. Legacy capabilities are leveraged as-is without mediation – increasing coupling between consumers and legacy systems. Tell tale sign here is if you see arcane naming and needless legacy data attributes sprinkled all over service interfaces.
  4. Services seem to have inconsistent runtime characteristics – new service capabilities are added without regard to performance requirements – issues tend to manifest in production where users or entire processes/applications get impacted to service behavior.
  5. Business processes bypass a service layer and directly access underlying data stores – if you have seen a business process invoking several stored procedures, doing FTP, publishing to multiple messaging destinations – all from a monolithic process definition that is a clear sign that governance is non existent.

These are few signs but key indicators that services are being built in a tactical fashion. In a follow up post, will expand on how governance can be leveraged appropriately to address these issues.


%d bloggers like this: