Value of Service Interfaces

January 4, 2015

Wrote earlier about why interfaces are important and in this post want to elaborate on their advantages for building reusable services. Service interfaces contain only the operation or method definitions and have no implementations. They can be used in a variety of ways:

  • Package service interfaces into a separate artifact to make it easy for client teams to integrate with services without pulling in bulky set of transitive dependencies
  • Bind the interfaces to one or more transport / integration technology via standard Dependency Injection (DI). For example, service interfaces can be integrated with a REST-ful Resource or a EMS listener.
  • Service interfaces can be backed by stub and/or mock implementation for automated unit and regression testing.
  • Service interfaces can be decorated with common cross-cutting concerns to separate them from the implementation. This is the strategy implemented via the Java Dynamic Proxy example.
  • Service interfaces can be implemented as a proxy to a remote implementation. For example, the client invokes the functionality via the interface but the runtime implementation makes a call to a server side API. This is useful if your teams need the flexibility to swap local / remote implementations depending on performance / dependency management related requirements
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Tips for Identifying Reusable Candidates from Existing Code

July 6, 2014

Here are a few quick tips to examine your existing code to identify reuse candidates:

  • Introduce Factory or Builder instead of repetitive boiler-plate code when constructing key objects. Several benefits: makes it easy to refactor and evolve how underlying objects are stitched together, makes it easy to write more intention revealing code, and very relevant / convenient when writing automated tests
  • Clarify functional behavior and tease out non-functional logic – look at how functional logic is implemented across your codebase. Do multiple projects share a common set of domain assets – objects, rules, services, and the like? if not, look for areas where functional logic is tightly bound to non-functional aspects like fine-grained metrics capture, exception handling, retry / timeout handling, etc.
  • Public API that needs to be accessed across platforms / devices are strong reuse candidates – for instance, are there functional APIs that don’t have a remote interface (e.g. a plain Java implementation without an appropriate REST-ful web service resource)? Do you need functionality to be made available across multiple devices with varying User Interface semantics? If so, look to carve the shared logic out into a service that can be accessed from multiple devices / integration points

Tips When Authoring Web Service Clients

November 3, 2013

Here are some tips when authoring web service clients:

  1. Decouple connectivity from request construction. This will isolate variations in input construction and the mechanics of service invocation cleanly separated. Additionally, the request construction might depend on the particular resource – e.g. they can be set of query string parameters or a more complex object structure.
  2. Connectivity logic should encapsulate the service URL and automatic-retry considerations. The client can automatically retry GET requests specified number of times if invocation encounters a connection timeout. It should also ensure response is OK (either via HTTP status codes or by examining appropriate response-specific data structures).
  3. Don’t swallow exceptions – the service might return a resource not found or an internal server error – the code that is using the client should be given the flexibility to deal with these exceptions appropriately – the client code shouldn’t assume or mask these exceptions. When in doubt, don’t suppress runtime exceptions.
  4. Decouple domain logic from service client – domain logic might dictate whether or not a service call needs to be made, or the nature of input resource data, etc. – this logic is more likely to change per the consuming application’s evolving requirements and shouldn’t be hosting service invocation code in the same class.
  5. Provide reusable API hooks for addressing cross-cutting concerns – such as response time capture and input and output messages – if you want to report response time trends when invoking a service you will not want to clutter this all over the consuming application’s codebase – the client can and should centralize these.

Remember the above is useful whether you are consuming a service or providing clients for your prospective service consumers.


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