Reducing Friction to Drive Platform Adoption

I wrote earlier about easing integration when providing reusable software assets. In this post, will elaborate on specific techniques for driving platform adoption & their rationale. Recognize that most developers who will evaluate your platform are trying to solve a specific business / functional problem. They want to quickly ascertain if what you are providing is a good fit or not. Instead of convincing them, help them arrive at a decision. Fast. How exactly do you do that? Here are a few ideas:

  • Provide details on the kinds of use cases your platform is designed to address. Equally important is to be transparent about the use cases that you don’t support. Not now and never ever will.
  • Create developer accelerators – e.g. a Maven Project Archetype or a sample project to try out common functionality
  • Identify areas where developers can extend the platform functionality – how will they supply or override new behavior? How will you make it possible to inject, easy to test, and safe to execute? There are lots of techniques that you can use but first you have to decide to what extent you want to allow this in the first place.
  • Make your platform available in “localhost” mode – i.e. conducive for use with the IDE toolset. This is more challenging than what it sounds – e.g. if your platform isn’t modular, making it work in local mode will be very challenging. Ditto if your platform relies on external services / connectivity / data stores, etc. that aren’t easily replaceable with in-memory / mock equivalents.
  • Allow developers to discover your platform via multiple learning paths. Some might want to explore using a series of Kata lessons that tackle increasingly complex use cases. Others might be looking for answers to a specific problem. You need a user guide, code kata, examples, and more importantly, you need to make them easy to access.
  • Identify which areas of the platform adoption curve are the most time consuming and figure out how to reduce if not eliminate them entirely. For instance – does your platform require an elaborate onboarding process? Are there steps that can be deferred till production deployment?
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