Pursuing BPM? Avoid Reuse Inhibitors

December 20, 2010

Implementing business process re-engineering and/or automation involves several moving parts from a technology perspective – stateful business process data, interfaces for external systems/user interfaces to interact with process information, and rules that determine several aspects of process behavior.

Here are some practices to avoid/minimize when pursuing BPM projects:

  • Building monolithic process definitions – as the number of process definitions increase there will be opportunities to refactor and simplify orchestration logic. As projects start to build on existing processes, there will be an increasing need for modular process definitions that can be leveraged as part of larger process definitions.
  • Placing business rules that validate domain objects in the process orchestration graphs. This will effectively tightly couple rules and a specific process hurting the ability to reuse domain-specific rules across process definitions. Certain class of rules could change often and need to be managed as a separate artifact.
  • Invoking vendor specific services directly from the process definition. Over time this will result in coupling between a vendor implementation and multiple process definitions. This also applies to service capabilities hosted on legacy systems. Hence, the need to use a service mediation layer.
  • Defining key domain objects within the scope of a particular process definition. This will result in multiple definitions of domain objects across processes. Over time, this will increase maintenance effort, data transformation, and redundant definitions across processes and service interfaces.
  • Integrating clients directly to the vendor-specific business process API. This will result in multiple clients implementing boiler plate logic – better practice will be to service enable these processes and consolidate entry points into the BPM layer.

This isn’t an exhaustive list – intent is to to highlight the areas where tight coupling could occur in the business process layer.


%d bloggers like this: